3D-printed guns: DOJ settlement paves way for DIY weapons

3D-printed guns: DOJ settlement paves way for DIY weapons

This Aug. 4, 2016, photo, provided by the Transportation Security Administration shows the plastic replica revolver TSA agents recovered from a passenger’s carry-on bag at Reno-Tahoe International Airport in a bowl used at the security checkpoint in Reno, Nev. The man agreed to leave the prohibited, fake firearm made from a 3D printer behind and was allowed to board the plane without incident. (Transportation Security Administration via AP) The home page of Defense Distributed’s website has set a date for when “the age of the downloadable gun formally begins”: Aug. 1. That’s when the Austin, Texas company plans to once again post blueprints on how to 3D-print guns, after being ordered to take them down five years ago. Cody Wilson, head of Defense Distributed, sued the State Department in 2015 on free-speech grounds. He won. Wired reported Tuesday that the Department of Justice settled with Wilson a couple of months ago, in a deal that includes paying for some of his legal fees. The DOJ has not returned a request for comment. During the years he was prohibited from sharing his DIY-gun blueprints online, Wilson raised money by selling Ghost Gunners, or computer-controlled milling machines that allow users to carve gun parts out of aluminum. Wired reported that he sold about 6,000 Ghost Gunners around the nation for about $1,675 each, which would have yielded him about $10 million. Wilson told this publication Wednesday that Wired “overstated how much money we have,” but did not answer a follow-up question […]

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