3D printing brings high-tech angle to gun debate

3D printing brings high-tech angle to gun debate

Gun Rights

Cody Wilson, with Defense Distributed, holds a 3D-printed gun called the Liberator at his shop Wednesday in Austin, Texas. Photo Credit: AP/Eric Gay Imagine pushing a button on a printer and creating a handgun made of the same plastic used in Legos. The prospect that 3D printers will usher in an age of downloadable weapons has sparked a national debate — and is raising red flags for law enforcement officials across Long Island. Many officials oppose the plastic guns. They worry about terrorists and criminals. They think about the guns falling into the hands of kids and the mentally ill. They point out the weapons are easy to conceal and hard to trace. Metal detectors can’t see them and they don’t turn up on any firearms registry or database. The gunmakers won’t have to go through any background check. "It makes our communities unsafe," said Madeline Singas, the Nassau County district attorney. "It makes our jobs in law enforcement much harder." Supporters of the homemade weapons, though, defend the technology and the constitutional right to own a gun. "This is freedom," said Erich Pratt, who heads Gun Owners of America, a lobbying group. "Why wouldn’t the Second Amendment protect the right of a law-abiding citizen to make his or her own weapons?" The issue came to a head last week when a federal judge temporarily blocked a Texas-based company from posting blueprints for 3D guns on its website. A month earlier, the Trump administration had signed off on the […]

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