As Parson touts endorsements from police, Galloway says he fell short on crime package

As Parson touts endorsements from police, Galloway says he fell short on crime package

Missouri Auditor Nicole Galloway, right, laughs as she talks with office workers in the Missouri Secretary of State offices in Jefferson City while filing paperwork to become a candidate for governor on Tuesday, Feb. 25, 2020. Also pictured with Galloway are her husband Jon Galloway and son Joseph Galloway, 3. Photo by David Carson, dcarson@post-dispatch.com David Carson JEFFERSON CITY — Gov. Mike Parson accomplished “virtually nothing” in calling lawmakers back to the Capitol for a special session on violent crime, Auditor Nicole Galloway said Wednesday. In an interview with the St. Louis Post-Dispatch editorial board, the Democratic candidate for governor said Parson’s push on crime was designed to distract from his “failed record” on the state’s response to the pandemic, which has killed more than 1,800 Missourians since March. Parson, a Republican who was appointed governor in 2018 after the exit of scandal-plagued Gov. Eric Greitens, signed two laws Monday sent to him by the GOP-led Legislature last week after five weeks of wrangling. They include a repeal of a residency law requiring St. Louis police to live within the city’s borders and the creation of a witness protection program to keep victims and witnesses safe during the investigation and prosecution of a violent crime. Both were backed by police officials. Parson, 65, has spent this week traveling across the state signing ceremonial versions of the bills and touting three endorsements he received from law enforcement groups. The Missouri Police Chiefs Association announced Wednesday it was endorsing Parson because […]

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