Background Checks Bill Introduced One Year After Parkland Shooting

Background Checks Bill Introduced One Year After Parkland Shooting

Gun Rights

SCPA students participate in a walkout on March 14, 2018, as part of a national protest of gun violence. It has been one year since the February 14 shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High in Parkland, Florida. Seventeen students and staff members were killed, 17 others were injured. The tragedy sparked student demonstrations nationwide and launched the March for Our Lives movement protesting gun violence. One of the students shot and killed in Parkland was Jamie Guttenberg, whose aunt Abbie Youkilis is a local physician. Dr. Youkilis became the faculty adviser for UC’s SAFE chapter after her family’s tragedy. SAFE, or Scrubs Addressing the Firearm Epidemic, treats gun violence as a public health problem and seeks evidence-based solutions. It’s not the only group in which doctors are speaking out about gun violence. When the National Rifle Association tweeted "Someone should tell self-important anti-gun doctors to stay in their lane," Trauma surgeon Dr. Joseph Sakran created the Twitter page @ThisIsOurLane . The page has attracted the attention of ER doctors nationwide who have shared their stories of treating gunshot wound victims. Also this month, for the first time in years, the House Judiciary Committee held a gun violence prevention. House Democrats have introduced a bill to require background checks for all firearm sales and most firearm transfers. The Bipartisan Background Checks Act, H.R. 8, is named for former Representative Gabrielle Giffords, who nearly died in a mass shooting outside an Arizona supermarket on January 8, 2011. Here in Cincinnati, community […]

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