Biden Gun Proposal Stands a Chance, If It’s Not About Guns (1)

Biden Gun Proposal Stands a Chance, If It’s Not About Guns (1)

Angelita McLaughlin, a mother who lost her son to gun violence, joins anti-violence interrupters and community activists in a march to demand an end to gun violence on July 14, 2020, in the Crown Heights neighborhood of Brooklyn, New York. Homicides and firearm injuries up across the country Federal funding for violence prevention historically absent A proposal from President Joe Biden to address a surge in firearm-related deaths nationwide may stand a chance of garnering Republican support—if he can convince them it isn’t gun control. As part of his initial infrastructure plan , Biden asked Congress in March for an extra $5 billion for community violence prevention programs over eight years—a proposal that longtime program leaders say would be the most significant federal investment in their efforts ever. Attorney General Merrick Garland also included Justice Department support for these programs in his Wednesday memo to agency staff on handling a rise in violent crime. Influential Senate Republicans say they are open to the idea, so long as officials don’t frame it as anti-gun, reduce the amount of spending, and separate it from the president’s broader infrastructure pitch. “I’m not aware of the proposal yet, so I’d want to see it before I responded to it,” said Sen. Joni Ernst (R-Iowa), vice chair of the Senate Republican Conference. “I’d want to know specifically where those dollars are being directed and how they’ll be spent. But generally, if there are ways we can prevent violence, we certainly want to do that.” […]

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