Bump stocks are turned in or destroyed as ban takes effect

Bump stocks are turned in or destroyed as ban takes effect

Gun Rights

FILE – In this Oct. 4, 2017, file photo, a device called a “bump stock” is attached to a semi-automatic rifle at the Gun Vault store and shooting range in South Jordan, Utah. In the days and weeks leading up to the ban on bump stocks that took effect Tuesday, March 26, 2019, tens of thousands of the devices were destroyed by owners or handed over to authorities. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer, File) BOISE, Idaho — The largest supplier of bump stocks turned in its entire remaining inventory to be destroyed — some 60,000 devices. Washington state’s buyback program was so popular it ran out of money. One dealer held a “Viking funeral” for his last bump stock, pouring a can of beer on it and then melting it down with a flamethrower. A nationwide ban took effect Tuesday on bump stocks, the attachment used by the gunman in the 2017 Las Vegas massacre to make his weapons fire rapidly like machine guns. How many of the estimated half-million devices believed to be in circulation in the U.S. are still around is anyone’s guess, but in the weeks leading up to the ban, there were signs that many were destroyed or turned in as required. Anyone in possession of a bump stock from now on can be charged with a federal offense punishable by up to 10 years in prison. The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives outlawed the attachments at President Donald Trump’s direction after the Las Vegas […]

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