Canada’s Gun Confiscation Scheme: Still More Questions than Answers

Canada’s Gun Confiscation Scheme: Still More Questions than Answers

On June 29, Yves Giroux, Canada’s Parliamentary Budget Officer, released a report on the estimated cost of implementing the firearm confiscation (“buyback”) program that is part of the sweeping Order-in-Council announced by Liberal Prime Minister Justin Trudeau on May 1, 2020. That law immediately banned more than 1,500 models of firearms (along with any current or future firearms that could be considered a “variant” of the listed guns) and established a time-limited amnesty that allows the owners of these formerly lawful guns to possess the guns until April 30, 2022 without incurring criminal liability. Owners would be offered the “choice of either grandfathering or compensation if they surrender the firearm,” with the details “announced later.” More than a year later, gun owners in Canada still have no information about how the grandfathering, confiscation, or compensation will work, although the government assures Canadians that it is “committed to a buy-back program that would allow you to return [turn in] your firearm for fair compensation.” Taxpayers are likewise still waiting for answers regarding the costs of implementing this law. Last fall, Bill Blair, the federal Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness overseeing the implementation of the gun ban, refused to answer questions about the price tag for this gun control scheme, although he had previously indicated that the “buyback” program alone was expected to cost between CAD$400 million and $600 million. Unfortunately, the new report by the Parliamentary Budget Officer (PBO) fails to shed much light on the compelling question […]

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