Charlottesville lawsuit asks court to reduce age limit for handgun sales

Charlottesville lawsuit asks court to reduce age limit for handgun sales

The Gun Control Act of 1968 set the legal precedents for the sale of guns in the United States. It determined licensing requirements, restrictions on who could purchase firearms, and regulation of interstate trading. Frank Wolfe // Wikimedia Commons An appeal filed on behalf of two University of Virginia students who claim a federal law restricting sales of handguns to people younger than 21 is unconstitutional appeared to gain some support in a recent hearing in front of the 4th Circuit Court of Appeals. The lawsuit, filed in October 2018 on behalf of then-20-year old Tanner Hirschfeld and then-18-year-old Natalia Marshall, asked the Western District Court of Virginia to declare the gun act unconstitutional and to stop enforcement of handgun and ammunition age restrictions. Last year, Senior U.S. District Judge Glen E. Conrad granted a motion to dismiss , writing that the plaintiffs’ Second Amendment rights weren’t violated by a 1968 law that makes it illegal for anyone under the age of 21 to purchase a handgun. The lawsuit was subsequently appealed to the 4th Circuit Court of Appeals where it was argued in front of a three-judge panel on Oct. 26. Over the course of the approximately hour-long virtual hearing, U.S. Circuit Judges Julius Richardson and Steven Agee directed many of their questions at how the current restrictions would be interpreted by the Founding Fathers and the difficult logic of loopholes found in the act. On behalf of Hirschfeld and Marshall, Charlottesville attorney Elliott Harding argued that the […]

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