Constitution’s Second Amendment gun rights invoked in birthright citizenship debate

Gun Rights

President Trump’s challenge this week to the long-held understanding that the Constitution guarantees citizenship to children born on U.S. soil, even if their mother was in the country illegally, has invoked another hotly debated constitutional right — to bear arms. Gun control advocates have long questioned whether the Constitution’s seemingly straightforward Second Amendment “right of the people to keep and bear arms” really means that the lady next door can legally keep a semiautomatic rifle in her bedroom. Courts and constitutional scholars have long sided with gun rights advocates who say it does. Trump this week questioned whether the Fourteenth Amendment’s seemingly straightforward guarantee that “all persons born or naturalized in the United States and subject to the jurisdiction thereof are citizens of the United States” applies to children of immigrants here illegally. Courts and constitutional scholars have long sided with immigration rights advocates who say it does. But the president’s pronouncement had gun-rights and immigration-rights advocates using each other’s logic as they trading arguments on social media this week. State Sen. Scott Wiener, D-San Francisco, ribbed conservatives on Twitter over whether their insistence that the Second Amendment means what it says applies to the Fourteenth. Antonio Salguero, a security contractor and former Libertarian state Senate candidate for the district east of San Diego, replied that both the Second and Fourteenth amendments “are very clear with no room for interpretation.” “Both Democrats and Republicans are wrong about a lot of things,” he added. The Firearms Policy Coalition, a gun […]

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Constitution’s Second Amendment gun rights invoked in birthright citizenship debate

Constitution’s Second Amendment gun rights invoked in birthright citizenship debate

Gun Rights

Alexander DeGarmo from Greenwood, Neb., speaks about the second amendment in front of the Supreme Court, Tuesday, June 26, 2018 in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon) President Trump’s challenge this week to the long-held understanding that the Constitution guarantees citizenship to children born on U.S. soil, even if their mother was in the country illegally, has invoked another hotly debated constitutional right — to bear arms. Gun control advocates have long questioned whether the Constitution’s seemingly straightforward Second Amendment “right of the people to keep and bear arms” really means that the lady next door can legally keep a semiautomatic rifle in her bedroom. Courts and constitutional scholars have long sided with gun rights advocates who say it does. Trump this week questioned whether the Fourteenth Amendment’s seemingly straightforward guarantee that “all persons born or naturalized in the United States and subject to the jurisdiction thereof are citizens of the United States” applies to children of immigrants here illegally. Courts and constitutional scholars have long sided with immigration rights advocates who say it does. But the president’s pronouncement had gun-rights and immigration-rights advocates using each other’s logic as they trading arguments on social media this week. State Sen. Scott Wiener, D-San Francisco, ribbed conservative gun-rights advocates on Twitter over whether their insistence that the Second Amendment means what it says applies to the Fourteenth. 14th Amendment: “All persons born or naturalized in the United States…are citizens of the United States” Yet Trump says he‘s ending birthright citizenship. I guess GOP […]

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