Control of the Narrative

Control of the Narrative

In a real scene, you can look around for the truth. This is what we depend on journalists to do. Too often, however, today’s reporters don’t report; they frame fake narratives. I recall the scene outside the U.S. Supreme Court building on the bright morning in 2008 when the Court was poised to hear D.C. v. Heller. This case resulted in a 5-4 decision in which the Court affirmed the Second Amendment does, indeed, protect an individual right. I watched as a handful of anti-Second Amendment activists were herded by a few TV talking heads into a tight group for the cameras. Shown this way, this small group of anti-freedom activists could be made to look like they were a small part of a large demonstration of people there to demand the high court rule the Second Amendment into meaninglessness. Even here, in front of the main entrance to the U.S. Supreme Court, and under the eyes of a pair of statues carved by James Earle Fraser—“Contemplation of Justice,” a seated woman holding a figure of blindfolded justice, and “Authority of Law,” a statue of a seated man holding a tablet of laws and a sheathed sword—these media members were busy shaping a fake-news narrative against our Second Amendment rights. This, of course, was just a small part of the overall scene. All around this obvious narrative shaping were hundreds of people peacefully lined up, all hoping for a spectator’s seat inside. Many had lined up before the sun […]

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