CT’s ‘red flag’ law — an early, but narrow, effort to take guns

CT’s ‘red flag’ law — an early, but narrow, effort to take guns

Gun Rights

The inventory of firearms seized by police under the warrant issued in the Olden case. Co-workers were concerned after Justin Olden, a Stafford public works employee, told them there would be “a mass shooting” if he continued to be reassigned to jobs outside the municipal garage. The co-workers were aware Olden owned guns and called the Stafford Police Department, which sought a risk warrant from a court to seize 18 rifles, shotguns and other weapons from his home. State police were able to remove Olden’s guns from his home because Connecticut enacted a law 20 years ago — the first in the nation — aimed at preventing people from hurting themselves or others. Since that law was enacted in 1999, nearly 2,000 risk warrants have been issued. But now there are questions of whether Connecticut’s law is tough enough. The popularity of risk warrants, also called extreme risk protective orders, or “red flag” laws has increased with the rise of mass shootings in the nation and are now at the center of a public debate in Washington on how to respond to the recent massacres in El Paso, Tex. and Dayton, Ohio, which claimed 31 lives. The number of states that adopted red flag laws surged after the Valentine’s Day, 2018 shooting in Parkland, Fla., that killed 17 students at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School. Ten states adopted red flag laws after that massacre and there was an attempt, which failed, to pass a federal extreme risk protective order […]

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