CURBING VIOLENCE: Another mass shooting brings question of gun control to the forefront again

CURBING VIOLENCE: Another mass shooting brings question of gun control to the forefront again

Keri Thornton | Daily Press Cherokee County Sheriff’s Office Deputy Pete Broderick completes a daily check of his firearm, an AR-15. W hen firearms are left in the hands of those who mean to do harm, lives can change in the blink of an eye, as evidenced by the recent mass shootings in Atlanta, Georgia; Boulder, Colorado; and even Muskogee, Oklahoma. The recent spate of shootings across the country has again increased demands for stricter gun control measures. Although the U.S. House of Representatives passed two measures recently that would expand requirements for background checks, they’re unlikely to pass the Senate. However, it appears many Oklahomans don’t believe increased restrictions are the answer, anyway. In Oklahoma, state law generally prevents knowingly transferring a firearm to convicted felons; people have have been adjudicated delinquent; those who are under the influence of alcohol or drugs; or people under adjudication of mental incompetency or have otherwise been found mentally unfit by a court. Compared to other states, Oklahoma has some of the least restrictive gun laws in the country, and many of its residents are armed. Law enforcement officers don’t seem to have an issue with their constituents carrying, either. Both Cherokee County Sheriff Jason Chennault and Tahlequah Police Department Chief Nate King believe legally-armed citizens are an asset in reducing violent crimes. So laws to further restrict gun ownership won’t make their lives easier, they said. "Increased restriction on gun ownerships will absolutely not help law enforcement, and people who think […]

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