‘Downloadable gun’ clears a legal obstacle, and activists are alarmed

‘Downloadable gun’ clears a legal obstacle, and activists are alarmed

Cody Wilson, a gun rights and free speech advocate, in Austin, Texas, May 14 ,2104. The United States in June 2018 agreed to allow Wilson to distribute online instruction manuals for a pistol that could be made by anyone with access to a 3-D printer. By Tiffany Hsu and Alan Feuer, New York Times News Service Learning to make a ghost gun — an untraceable, unregistered firearm without a serial number — could soon become much easier. The United States last month agreed to allow a Texas man to distribute online instruction manuals for a pistol that could be made by anyone with access to a 3-D printer. The man, Cody Wilson, had sued the government in 2015 after the State Department forced him to take down the instructions because they violated export laws. Wilson, who is well-known in anarchist and gun-rights communities, complained that his right to free speech was being stifled and that he was sharing computer code, not actual guns. The case was settled on June 29, and Wilson gave The New York Times a copy of the agreement last week. The settlement states that 3-D printing tutorials are approved “for public release (i.e. unlimited distribution) in any form.” The government also agreed to pay nearly $40,000 of Wilson’s legal fees. The willingness to resolve the case — after the government had won some lower court judgments — has raised alarms among gun-control advocates, who said it would make it easier for felons and others to […]

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‘Downloadable gun’ clears a legal obstacle, and activists are alarmed

‘Downloadable gun’ clears a legal obstacle, and activists are alarmed

Ilana Panich-Linsman / The New York Times Cody Wilson, a gun rights and free speech advocate, in Austin, Texas, May 14 ,2104. The United States in June 2018 agreed to allow Wilson to distribute online instruction manuals for a pistol that could be made by anyone with access to a 3-D printer. By Tiffany Hsu and Alan Feuer, New York Times News Service Learning to make a ghost gun — an untraceable, unregistered firearm without a serial number — could soon become much easier. The United States last month agreed to allow a Texas man to distribute online instruction manuals for a pistol that could be made by anyone with access to a 3-D printer. The man, Cody Wilson, had sued the government in 2015 after the State Department forced him to take down the instructions because they violated export laws. Wilson, who is well-known in anarchist and gun-rights communities, complained that his right to free speech was being stifled and that he was sharing computer code, not actual guns. The case was settled on June 29, and Wilson gave The New York Times a copy of the agreement last week. The settlement states that 3-D printing tutorials are approved “for public release (i.e. unlimited distribution) in any form.” The government also agreed to pay nearly $40,000 of Wilson’s legal fees. The willingness to resolve the case — after the government had won some lower court judgments — has raised alarms among gun-control advocates, who said it would make […]

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‘Downloadable Gun’ Clears a Legal Obstacle, and Activists Are Alarmed

‘Downloadable Gun’ Clears a Legal Obstacle, and Activists Are Alarmed

Cody Wilson in Austin, Tex., in 2014. He said his settlement with the government would allow gun-making enthusiasts to come out from the shadows. Learning to make a so-called ghost gun — an untraceable, unregistered firearm without a serial number — could soon become much easier. The United States last month agreed to allow a Texas man to distribute online instruction manuals for a pistol that could be made by anyone with access to a 3-D printer. The man, Cody Wilson, had sued the government in 2015 after the State Department forced him to take down the instructions because they violated export laws. Mr. Wilson, who is well known in anarchist and gun-rights communities, complained that his right to free speech was being stifled and that he was sharing computer code, not actual guns. The case was settled on June 29, and Mr. Wilson gave The New York Times a copy of the agreement this week. The settlement states that 3-D printing tutorials are approved “for public release (i.e. unlimited distribution) in any form.” The government also agreed to pay nearly $40,000 of Mr. Wilson’s legal fees. The willingness to resolve the case — after the government had won some lower court judgments — has raised alarms among gun-control advocates, who said it would make it easier for felons and others to get firearms. Some critics said it suggested close ties between the Trump administration and gun-ownership advocates, this week filing requests for documents that might explain why the […]

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