Efforts Mounting to Bar Gun Possession by Those Convicted of Animal Cruelty

Efforts Mounting to Bar Gun Possession by Those Convicted of Animal Cruelty

Gun Rights

Gun Policy This story was produced by FairWarning , a nonprofit news organization based in Southern California that focuses on public health, consumer and environmental issues. A conviction for domestic violence in the U.S. strips a person of the legal right to possess a gun. It doesn’t matter if the conviction is a misdemeanor or a felony. The rationale for the federal law: Domestic violence is a red flag for future violence — including potentially deadly violence with a firearm. Scientific and anecdotal evidence suggests that a person who abuses animals also has a higher likelihood of hurting other people. And that insight has begun fueling a push, at the state and federal levels, to slap a no-gun penalty on anyone convicted of animal cruelty. “As we look at some of the recent mass shootings from Columbine to Parkland to Sutherland Springs, these perpetrators had a history of animal abuse. Addressing this pattern of behavior is a part of the solution for preventing gun violence and hopefully saving lives,” said Massachusetts Congresswoman Katherine M. Clark, a Democrat, who in July introduced a bill focusing on the issue. Local officials also are recognizing animal abuse as a human safety issue. A partnership between the New York City Police Department and the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals has more than tripled arrests for animal abuse in New York City since its 2014 launch. Around the country, at least 75 state and local prosecuting offices have personnel specializing […]

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Efforts Mounting to Bar Gun Possession by Those Convicted of Animal Cruelty

Efforts Mounting to Bar Gun Possession by Those Convicted of Animal Cruelty

Gun Rights

Gov. Tom Wolf, left, at signing ceremony in June 2017 for a Pennsylvania animal cruelty bill. It added felony-level penalties for first-time aggravated animal cruelty offenses such as torture. (AP Photo/Marc Levy) A conviction for domestic violence in the U.S. strips a person of the legal right to possess a gun. It doesn’t matter if the conviction is a misdemeanor or a felony. The rationale for the federal law: Domestic violence is a red flag for future violence — including potentially deadly violence with a firearm. Scientific and anecdotal evidence suggests that a person who abuses animals also has a higher likelihood of hurting other people. And that insight has begun fueling a push, at the state and federal levels, to slap a no-gun penalty on anyone convicted of animal cruelty. “As we look at some of the recent mass shootings from Columbine to Parkland to Sutherland Springs, these perpetrators had a history of animal abuse. Addressing this pattern of behavior is a part of the solution for preventing gun violence and hopefully saving lives,” said U.S. Rep. Katherine M. Clark, D-Mass., who in July introduced a bill focusing on the issue. Local officials also are recognizing animal abuse as a human safety issue. A partnership between the New York City Police Department and the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals has more than tripled arrests for animal abuse in New York City since its 2014 launch. Around the country, at least 75 state and local […]

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