Fate of Texas abortion ban at Supreme Court tied to federal intervention in 1895 railroad strike

Fate of Texas abortion ban at Supreme Court tied to federal intervention in 1895 railroad strike

In this Oct. 18, 2021 photo, the Supreme Court is seen in Washington. Texas is urging the Supreme Court to leave in place its law banning most abortions and telling the justices there’s no reason to rush into the case. The state filed its response Thursday to the Biden administration’s call on the high court to block the law and rule conclusively this term on the measure’s constitutionality. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite) WASHINGTON – Two major points of contention came into focus Wednesday as the U.S. Supreme Court collected briefs ahead of its snap hearing on Texas’ six-week abortion ban. First, did Texas manage to make its ban legally impervious by outsourcing enforcement to bounty hunters – even though it clearly violates a half-century of protections for abortion rights until a fetus can survive outside the womb. The other is whether the federal government can invoke the public interest to insert itself in lawsuits between private parties – in this case, Texas abortion providers and the limitless supply of people anywhere who might want to sue them under Senate Bill 8. Texas insists that its law is crafted so well, no one has jurisdiction to challenge. In its 93-page brief , the state maintains that since no state official enforces the ban, the Justice Department lacks standing. Abortion clinics also can’t challenge the law because– as the Legislature intended – they can’t “identify an appropriate defendant.” Since 1973 and the Roe vs. Wade ruling, the court has allowed abortion […]

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