Fearful of federal ‘gun grabs,’ lawmakers seek to use SC militia law

The origins of the Second Amendment The Second Amendment provides U.S. citizens the right to bear arms. But why did the Founding Fathers create it and how did it become a part of the Bill of Rights? By Nicole L. Cvetnic captions and subtitles off, selected The Second Amendment provides U.S. citizens the right to bear arms. But why did the Founding Fathers create it and how did it become a part of the Bill of Rights? By Nicole L. Cvetnic A Republican South Carolina senator worried about future federal “gun grabs” got backing from a Senate panel this week on his proposal that regulates what types of weapons members of the state’s “unorganized militia” can haveand says that militia cannot be regulated by any entity or person outside of South Carolina. The expansion of the rights and powers of the states’ already existing “unorganized militia” is a reaction, some sponsors say, to fears that Democratic President Joe Biden’s administration will go after South Carolinians’ guns. The Senate’s Family and Veterans Services Committee voted 8-6 Wednesday to send S. 614 to the floor over concerns from mostly Democratic lawmakers who questioned whether the legislation is constitutional. In the state Constitution, South Carolina’s “unorganized militia” was founded in the event that more forces than the National Guard had available were needed to respond to a statewide emergency. Its membership is any “able-bodied” South Carolinian ages 18 to 45, according to state law. The militia hasn’t been called up, though, any […]

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