Gun control backers called Parkland a turning point — but big results may depend on the election

Since the Parkland shooting, the so-called “March for Our Lives” demonstrations brought millions of activists into the streets in Washington and dozens of other cities, and the push for reform of gun laws has resonated in the news and on social media for months. Fifth District DFL Rep. Keith Ellison said “it feels like something has changed.” DFL Sen. Amy Klobuchar called the moment a “tipping point.” First District DFL Rep. Tim Walz said it “felt different.” In the wake of the February high school shooting in Parkland, Florida — and the passionate activism that followed from the student survivors of the attack — politicians from Washington to St. Paul were predicting it was a landmark shift in the country’s gun debate. Gone, some of them said, was the familiar cycle in which outrage and calls for action from elected officials would peak after a mass shooting, and then subside after reforms failed to get traction and the news cycle moved on. Since then, the so-called “March for Our Lives” demonstrations brought millions of activists into the streets in Washington and dozens of other cities, and the push for reform of gun laws has resonated in the news and on social media for months. Lawmakers in Congress and in state legislatures have responded by passing a range of gun-related reforms. But so far, the activism generated by the Parkland shooting has failed to pressure lawmakers into passing the kind of sweeping gun reforms, like universal background checks for purchasing […]

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