Gun safes work. But most gun owners don’t use them.

Gun safes work. But most gun owners don’t use them.

Gun News

America has become habituated to stories of teenagers too young to purchase a firearm who commit mass shootings with guns belonging to family members. Recent gun violence in Santa Fe, Tex., and Noblesville, Ind., are only the latest in a long line of attacks committed by teens with other people’s weapons. One common suggestion after mass shootings is that the best way to prevent such incidents would be to lock guns and ammunition away when not in use, so the weapons stay out of the hands of the wrong people. This year, bills or ballot measures to require safe storage have been proposed in Delaware, Washington, Oregon, Missouri and Virginia. Even a figure as staunchly pro-gun as Texas’s Republican lieutenant governor, Dan Patrick, called on gun-owning parents to lock up their weapons after the Santa Fe shooting. Newspaper editorial boards and opinion writers from gun-friendly locales such as St. Louis ; Gainesville, Fla . ; and Racine, Wis., have endorsed the practice. A survey released this May by Johns Hopkins University found that almost 60 percent of gun owners support laws that require safe storage. Yet what seems like a common-sense safeguard runs contrary to the dominant rationale for gun ownership, which is self-defense. And the National Rifle Association has fostered an ideology of perpetual vigilance against nightmare scenarios such as home invasions. The gun industry caters to buyers motivated by fear of other people: Handgun manufacturer Glock, for instance, has marketed its weapons with ads that depict break-ins […]

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