Hermiston History: Arguments for the Second Amendment

Hermiston History: Arguments for the Second Amendment

HH file photo. Youngsters play in the Hermiston swimming pool on a hot day in July 1968. HH file photo. Jaime Chambers, 16, Pilot Rock; Danella Gage, 16, Hermiston; and Gretchen Bracher, 16, Hermiston (left to right) were chosen to reign over the 1993 Umatilla County Fair. HH file photo. Deric Corriel, 9, Irrigon, greets a Carson and Barnes Circus public relations representative, Suzy, one of the 19 Asian Elephants, while handler Reggie Lindsey stands by in July 1993. 25 YEARS AGO July 13, 1993 The Hermiston School District approved the signing of a “memo of understanding” at its monthly board meeting. The document helps prepare public schools for “maximum protection” in the event of an accident at the Umatilla Army Depot. The memo provides for two options for responding to a chemical agent accident at the depot. The first is to provide buses to transport students out of the Immediate Response Zone — the area immediately surrounding the depot, which includes the Hermiston, Umatilla and Irrigon area. The second option is to have portions of the affected schools “positive-overpressurized.” According to the memo, overpressurization would eliminate the need for an evacuation, “ensuring to the maximum extent possible with technology that the school children would be safe.” Pratton told the board that overpressurizing part of the school facilities is the recommended choice of Army Depot Lt. Col. William McCune. With the overpressurization method, students could be expected to remain confined in the “safe haven” for at least 72 hours. […]

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