Highland Park was at the center of gun-control debate long before Monday’s shooting; just days ago city honored Uvalde victims

Highland Park was at the center of gun-control debate long before Monday’s shooting; just days ago city honored Uvalde victims

Brian Cassella/Chicago Tribune/TNS What haunts longtime Highland Park resident Dana Gordon now are the words of the mother of one of the Uvalde, Texas, school shooting victims. Just days ago, Gordon helped organize an event in Highland Park dubbed “a community art action against gun violence.” It was prompted by the Uvalde shooting in May, and the names of its 21 victims were read. Moments after a mass shooting rocked her own hometown Monday, Gordon found herself recalling the words of Kimberly Rubio, the mother of Uvalde victim Lexi Rubio, from her video testimony to Congress: “Somewhere out there. there’s a mom listening to our testimony thinking, ‘I can’t even imagine their pain,’ not knowing that our reality will one day be hers unless we act now.” “And now here we are,” Gordon said Monday. “Next time we will have to read the names of our own victims.” That members of the Highland Park community had gathered to mourn victims of another American massacre not 10 days before someone opened fired during the local Fourth of July parade was a horrific coincidence. Yet Highland Park has had a prominent history of gun rights activism and controversy. An affluent suburb abutting Lake Michigan with a large Jewish population and predominantly liberal politics, Highland Park leaders enacted a ban on assault rifles in 2013 that was swiftly challenged by a local doctor and the Illinois Rifle Association. That legal fight was appealed all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court, which […]

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