How a medieval English law affects the US gun control debate

How a medieval English law affects the US gun control debate

Getty Images Image caption, Guns did not exist in Europe when the statute was passed A medieval English law dating back nearly seven centuries is now at the heart of the most important US Supreme Court gun case in a decade. The case – which stems from a New York legal battle – challenges a state law that requires that gun users who want a concealed carry permit first prove they have a valid reason. To help them determine how broad the rights of America’s many gun owners go, the country’s nine supreme court judges are also looking back to the 1328 Statute of Northampton, which dates back to the reign of Edward III. Here’s what we know. What’s the case? On Wednesday, the Supreme Court began hearing oral arguments in the case of the New York Rifle and Pistol Association v Brien, which revolves around New York’s regulations governing concealed carry licenses. New York’s laws require that residents who want a license to carry a concealed pistol must prove they have “proper cause” for it and that they face “a special or unique” level of danger. The two plaintiffs in the case, Robert Nash and Brandon Koch, applied for a concealed carry permit but were denied, although they were given licenses that allow them to carry guns for recreational purposes such as hunting and target shooting. With the support of the New York Rifle and Pistol Association – which is affiliated with the National Rifle Association (NRA) – […]

Click here to view original web page at How a medieval English law affects the US gun control debate

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.