How a powerful state law blocks Ohio cities from gun regulation

How a powerful state law blocks Ohio cities from gun regulation

Clyde, a small city of 6,100 in Sandusky County, quickly learned the limits of its political power when it tried to ban guns at its city parks. Armed men identifying themselves with the Boogaloo Movement stand outside the Ohio Capitol Jan. 17. COLUMBUS, Ohio — The Ohio Supreme Court declined Wednesday to review an appellate court’s decision, letting stand a ruling that the city of Cincinnati cannot ban “bump stocks” on assault weapons. Cincinnati tried to ban use of the mechanical attachments , designed to increase rifles’ rates of fire, in 2018 after a shooter used one during a 2017 massacre in Las Vegas that left 58 dead. The final outcome, announced last week, is just the latest instance of Ohio courts ruling that cities cannot enact end-runs around a state legislature regularly seeking to expand gun rights. Cincinnati’s efforts met the same fate as those of Cleveland, Cleveland (again), and Clyde when they tried, amid a rising tide of mass shootings in the U.S., to pass their own gun violence prevention measures. The cities’ legal failures trace back to a powerful state law , passed in 2006 and strengthened twice since, which preempts cities from regulating guns. Forty-three states have similar laws on the books , according to the Giffords Law Center to Prevent Gun Violence. When it comes to guns, the law essentially trumps language in the Ohio Constitution giving cities authority to govern themselves . The cities’ ordinances mirror a legislature moving in the opposite direction […]

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.