How #MarchForOurLives Leaves Out Gun Violence Survivors Like Me

How #MarchForOurLives Leaves Out Gun Violence Survivors Like Me

In the aftermath of the Sandy Hook massacre in Newtown, Connecticut I suffered from such profound secondary trauma that I didn’t get my period for more than two months. Being a gun crime survivor myself, as well as having worked with children the same age as the Sandy Hook victims, the event was a combustive force that affected my mental and physical health for months after. When my period finally came it was so extreme and painful my friends likened it to a prolonged miscarriage, even though I’ve never been pregnant and am childfree by choice. For days I was crumpled into the fetal position, weeping, and thinking about all the Sandy Hook moms who would never see their kids again, and all the others who would spend so much of their lives now in fear. Fast forward six years; the Valentine’s Day Parkland massacre happened just thirteen miles from my home. The shock and horror that rippled through our community after this event was reminiscent of the pre- and post-Hurricane Irma devastation. There was a palpable hysteria in the air that made simple acts like going to the store or movies feel scary and unpredictable. And unlike other school shootings, the survivors of Parkland were suddenly catapulted into the global media spotlight as the newest and youngest advocates for gun control — a role that troubles me given how much acute trauma they are already processing after watching their classmates gunned down so mercilessly. And once again my […]

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.