How the Irish in America banned guns in New York

How the Irish in America banned guns in New York

Big Tim Sullivan. Public Domain THERE are plenty of Irish Catholics who believe their Hibernian roots are a cozy and natural fit for Fox News. So it’s a good time for a reminder that Irish immigrants played a central role in limiting their cherished Second Amendment rights. Which may not be limited much longer, if the Supreme Court has anything to say about it. “A New York law that imposes strict limits on carrying guns outside the home seemed unlikely to survive its encounter with the Supreme Court,” The New York Times reported last week. The law in question “requires people seeking a license to carry a handgun in public to show a ‘proper cause,’ and a majority of the justices seemed prepared to say that it imposes an intolerable burden on the rights guaranteed by the Second Amendment.” New York State’s infamously tough gun laws are rooted in something called the Sullivan Act. The law is named after “Big Tim” Sullivan, a Tammany Hall loyalist who served a little over 100 years ago. Sullivan’s father came to Manhattan from the Beara Peninsula, while his mother came from Kenmare, Kerry. Lore has it that “Big Tim” — he towered over most other Tammany Irishmen — grew up in the infamous Five Points. Sullivan held numerous elected offices, from the State Assembly to U.S. Congress. He was serving in the State Senate in 1911 when he engineered the passage of a statewide law that made it very difficult to carry […]

Click here to view original web page at How the Irish in America banned guns in New York

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.