How the Second Amendment Built In Inequity in the Nation’s Gun Laws

How the Second Amendment Built In Inequity in the Nation’s Gun Laws

As part of 101.9 WDET’s Book Club, we’re inviting the Detroit region to examine and discuss the text that impacts every resident of the United States: The Constitution. Whether you’re revisiting the documents or reading them for the first time, join us in reading along and engaging in civil conversations with your community. White people often don’t give a traffic stop a second thought. Be polite. Do what you’re told. Take the ticket. But for Black people, any contact with police can be a nerve-wracking experience. “African American men don’t always feel comfortable around law enforcement anyway. And so when you add a firearm into that mix, it definitely ups the level of fear to a degree or a paranoia.” —Chad King, Detroit’s Black Bottom Gun Club “African American men don’t always feel comfortable around law enforcement anyway. And so when you add a firearm into that mix, it definitely ups the level of fear to a degree or a paranoia, whatever you want to call it, but you’re definitely more on edge than not,” says Chad King, who is the president of Detroit’s Black Bottom Gun Club. He says when adding a gun to a traffic stop, the situation gets even worse. Too often that uneasiness is warranted. Blacks are 2 ½ times more likely to be killed by police than whites. In 2016, Philando Castile, who had a concealed-carry permit, was driving in a St. Paul, Minnesota, suburb with his girlfriend Diamond Reynolds and her 4-year-old daughter. […]

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