I Escaped The Gun Cult After A Decade As An NRA Life Member, And Your Loved Ones Can Too

I Escaped The Gun Cult After A Decade As An NRA Life Member, And Your Loved Ones Can Too

I have a barrister bookcase, one of those with the glass doors that swing up and open. On the top shelf sits a little bronze sculpture. It depicts a colonial-era minuteman standing next to a framed and embossed copy of the Second Amendment, right above the NRA logo. A tiny plaque screwed to the wooden base contains my name and apparent status as a lifetime member. I keep that statue to remind me that anyone can be indoctrinated into believing nonsense. If you’ve been following this column since the beginning, you know that I’m among the 14 percent of Americans who own an unhealthy number of guns . Where I grew up, guns are a part of life. Children are taught marksmanship (as a teenager, I twice shot competitively at the Wolf Creek shooting sports facility built for the Atlanta Olympics). Guns, in rural America, are viewed as important, necessary, and fundamental to life itself. For a long time, I believed that, even as I voted Democrat. In my early 20s, I dished out $500 to the NRA to become a life member. At that time, to me, it felt like the NRA was about hunting, comradery with other people who enjoyed an outdoor lifestyle, and educating young people about gun safety. I was blind to the toxicity festering in the NRA even then, but things really started to devolve quickly after the federal assault weapons ban expired in 2004. People in the gun community scrambled to horde all […]

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