I was a federal prosecutor. Here’s why more gun control laws are not the answer

I was a federal prosecutor. Here’s why more gun control laws are not the answer

Armed with an AR-15-style rife, Brian Isaack Clyde (shown) attacks the Earle Cabell Federal Building June 17, 2019 in downtown Dallas. Law enforcement returned fire and the shooter was hit by gunfire. No officers or citizens were injured. In the wake of mass shootings in Atlanta, Boulder and Indianapolis, I was reminded of a morning in June 2019, when I was on my way into the office and received a panicked phone call with frightening news. A gunman wearing tactical gear and carrying a large rifle was shooting into the lobby of the Earle Cabell Federal Building in Dallas. Many of my team of federal prosecutors were just arriving into work or were already inside — as were hundreds of other federal employees. We were so fortunate. The Federal Protective Service took down the shooter, and no one else was killed or injured. But that moment came back vividly as I watched the recent coverage of the shooters in Atlanta, Boulder and Indianapolis. Other memories also flooded back, and they point to the problem that has kept federal prosecutors like me up at night. Throughout my career, I have supported prosecuting gun crime as a way to reduce violent crime and the office I led prosecuted countless gun crime cases. After each active shooter case, I’ve watched commentators chatter in the direction of more gun control laws, even as I and my fellow prosecutors have used the laws already on the books to put people behind bars. As if […]

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