In Supreme Court March Madness, eight justices remain standing

In Supreme Court March Madness, eight justices remain standing

The first round of SCOTUS bracketology – our unofficial tournament to allow readers to choose the greatest Supreme Court justice – wasn’t as chaotic as the first weekend of the NCAA tournament. There were no stunning upsets of juggernaut justices and no magical runs from measly 15-seeds. But a couple of contests did end in virtual buzzer beaters, and now only eight justices remain. The full first-round results are here . As a reminder, we chose 16 former justices to start the tournament (no current justices were included). We invited feedback on our seeding and selection criteria – and like any good March Madness debate, there was no shortage of quibbling. Fans of Chief Justice William Howard Taft and Justices Harry Blackmun, Benjamin Cardozo and John Paul Stevens were among those who registered their displeasure. Even the institute named for Justice James Wilson chimed in . But the preponderance of complaints centered on the selection committee’s omission of two justices: Justice William Douglas (whose snub inspired an impassioned Twitter thread on Douglas’ greatness) and Justice Robert Jackson (whose gorgeous prose is prettier than Corey Kispert’s jump shot ). What we can say? We agree that Douglas and Jackson were tough exclusions – neither would be out of place in this tournament. Perhaps they are like Duke and Kentucky – longstanding powerhouses who simply have to wait until next year’s Big Dance. In any event, this year’s title remains up for grabs, and it’s up to you to decide who […]

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