Kavanaugh, Trump’s Supreme Court pick, has sided with broad views of presidential powers

Kavanaugh, Trump’s Supreme Court pick, has sided with broad views of presidential powers

0 Judge Brett Kavanaugh speaks to the crowd after U.S. President Donald Trump nominated him to the Supreme Court during a ceremony in the East Room of the White House July 9, 2018 in Washington, D.C. WASHINGTON — Brett Kavanaugh, the federal judge nominated by President Donald Trump on Monday to the Supreme Court, has endorsed robust views of the powers of the president, consistently siding with arguments in favor of broad executive authority during his 12 years on the bench in Washington. He has called for restructuring the government’s consumer watchdog agency so the president could remove the director, and has been a leading defender of the government’s position when it comes to using military commissions to prosecute terrorism suspects. Kavanaugh is "an unrelenting, unapologetic defender of presidential power" who believes courts can and should actively seek to rein in "large swaths of the current administrative state," said University of Texas law professor Stephen Vladeck, who closely followsthe U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit. Kavanaugh’s record suggests that if he is confirmed, he would be more to the right than the man he would replace, Justice Anthony Kennedy, for whom he clerked. Kavanaugh has staked out conservative positions in cases involving gun rights, abortion and the separation of powers. Still, in the run-up to his nomination on Monday, Kavanaugh fielded criticism from some social conservatives who objected to language he used in connection withthe Affordable Care Act’s contraception mandate, and to his opinion in […]

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Kavanaugh, Trump’s Supreme Court pick, has sided with broad views of presidential powers

Kavanaugh, Trump's Supreme Court pick, has sided with broad views of presidential powers

WASHINGTON – Brett Kavanaugh, the federal judge nominated by President Donald Trump on Monday to the Supreme Court, has endorsed robust views of the powers of the president, consistently siding with arguments in favor of broad executive authority during his 12 years on the bench in Washington. He has called for restructuring the government’s consumer watchdog agency so the president could remove the director, and has been a leading defender of the government’s position when it comes to using military commissions to prosecute terrorism suspects. Kavanaugh is "an unrelenting, unapologetic defender of presidential power" who believes courts can and should actively seek to rein in "large swaths of the current administrative state," said University of Texas law professor Stephen Vladeck, who closely followsthe U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit. Kavanaugh’s record suggests that if he is confirmed, he would be more to the right than the man he would replace, Justice Anthony Kennedy, for whom he clerked. Kavanaugh has staked out conservative positions in cases involving gun rights, abortion and the separation of powers. Still, in the run-up to his nomination on Monday, Kavanaugh fielded criticism from some social conservatives who objected to language he used in connection withthe Affordable Care Act’s contraception mandate, and to his opinion in a case involving an immigrant teen seeking an abortion. Some of Trump’s core backers also expressed concerns about his ties to the Bush family and GOP establishment. Washington lawyer Helgi Walker, who worked with Kavanaugh in […]

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