Law professor says high-capacity magazine ban in Measure 114 could be most vulnerable

Law professor says high-capacity magazine ban in Measure 114 could be most vulnerable

There are a few different pieces to Measure 114, and a constitutional law professor we spoke to said it’s possible that only part of it gets tossed out. PORTLAND, Ore. — While votes were still being counted after Election Day this month — and well beyond — the fact that gun control initiative Measure 114 was projected to narrowly pass proved enough for some of Oregon’s arcane administrative mechanics to begin churning. According to the Secretary of State’s office, laws passed via initiative petition like this one go into effect precisely one month after the election: midnight on Thursday, Dec. 8. Even the authors of Measure 114 said that they thought it would become effective a month after the vote was certified. When and if Measure 114 becomes law in its current form, it would require a permit in order to buy a gun. Buyers would have to get a permit that’s expected to cost around $65 and complete an approved firearms safety course, which would also likely come at a cost. The permits also require submission of a photo ID, fingerprinting and a criminal background check. Permit applications would be handled by the local police department or county sheriff’s office, and Oregon State Police would handle background checks — which they already do for firearms purchases. All of that information would then go into a database. Measure 114 also bans the sale of magazines that hold more than 10 rounds. Immediately after the measure passed, a few Oregon […]

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