Lawsuit claims Stoughton police broke law by selling confiscated guns

Lawsuit claims Stoughton police broke law by selling confiscated guns

Gun Rights

A receipt from the Village Vault showing the value in store credit exchanged for 21 guns confiscated by Stoughton Police. Hide caption The Enterprise Enterprise_Ben In a civil complaint filed in U.S. District Court, former Stoughton resident Mykel Powell and his attorneys argued Stoughton police were legally obligated to wait a full year before turning Powell’s guns over to the Mass. State Police for destruction or public auction. STOUGHTON — A man has sued three police officials for allegedly selling his guns in violation of state law, after officers confiscated the weapons following his arrest in a 2015 assault and battery case. In a civil complaint filed in U.S. District Court, former Stoughton resident Mykel Powell and his attorneys argued Stoughton police were legally obligated to wait a full year before turning Powell’s guns over to the Mass. State Police for destruction or public auction. Instead, as Powell and his attorneys outline in the lawsuit, a Stoughton detective sold a collection of 21 confiscated guns, including Powell’s handgun and rifle, to a private gun shop in Northborough in exchange for $2,850 in store credit, which was used to buy equipment for the Police Department. Powell’s guns had spent only 11 months in police custody before the exchange, allegedly violating another law that gave Powell a full year to recover his property. Stoughton police spokesman Lt. John Bonney said he could not offer a detailed response to the allegations. Three of the defendants — Chief Donna McNamara, Deputy Chief Brian […]

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