Legislative gun law changes inspired by October 1 have seen middling adoption over last nine months; advocates urge patience

Legislative gun law changes inspired by October 1 have seen middling adoption over last nine months; advocates urge patience

Flowers lay on the ground near the Route 91 Festival grounds on Tuesday, October 3, 2017 following a deadly shooting that took place late Sunday night. (Daniel Clark/The Nevada Independent) Democratic lawmakers entered the 2019 Legislature with a clear vision in mind; toughen up Nevada’s historically loose gun laws. State Democrats had won a near sweep and clear legislative majorities in the 2018 midterm election, the first election since the 2017 mass shooting at the Route 91 Harvest Festival that left 58 people dead and hundreds more injured. On the campaign trail, Democrats did not shy away and instead campaigned on preventing gun violence; one of Steve Sisolak’s most memorable ads focused directly on the mass shooting and a promise to ban “assault rifles, bump stocks, silencers.” Within the first two weeks of the Legislature, Democrats had passed (along party lines) a bill to finally implement a narrowly passed 2016 initiative requiring background checks on private party gun sales. By the end of the 120-day session, they had passed a “1 October Bill” ( AB291 ) banning bump stocks, raising blood alcohol limits for firearm possession and implementing a legal process allowing courts to temporarily seize firearms from a person displaying high-risk behavior. Many of the bills elicited a strong negative reaction from pro-gun rights groups (including the National Rifle Association), with opponents flooding the halls of the Legislature to oppose the measures as unnecessary or overly punitive. Still, Democratic lawmakers — including bill sponsor and October 1 survivor […]

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