Missouri lawmakers gained traction this year in an attempt to close the domestic violence gun loophole — and they’re already preparing for next year

Missouri lawmakers gained traction this year in an attempt to close the domestic violence gun loophole — and they’re already preparing for next year

Efforts this year to close Missouri’s domestic violence gun loophole were ultimately unsuccessful this year — but lawmakers on both sides of the aisle promised to continue their efforts next year. The loophole was created in 2016 when Missouri expanded concealed carry in the state, doing away with permits. Language preventing individuals convicted of a domestic violence misdemeanor or the respondent of a full order of protection from possessing a firearm became essentially null since it was triggered through the concealed carry permit process. Legislators at the time vowed to come back the next year and add those protections back in — but it never happened. Right to bear arms + safeguarding vulnerable people While a House bill, sponsored by a Republican, stalled in the lower chamber, Sen. Lauren Arthur thought she found the perfect avenue to once and for all address Missouri’s domestic violence gun loophole: the Second Amendment Preservation Act. Dubbed SAPA, the massive pro-gun package had been earmarked a priority for Republicans in both chambers before session’s end. It would nullify certain federal laws that restrict gun ownership, including those related to confiscation orders, taxes, and tracking. And as it came to the Senate floor on the second to last day of session, Arthur attempted to add an amendment — that would mirror federal law — to prevent those convicted of domestic violence from owning a firearm. “It is my hope that as we have a discussion about the right to bear arms that we also […]

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