More capacity, planning needed for involuntary commitments in DeWine gun bill, groups say

More capacity, planning needed for involuntary commitments in DeWine gun bill, groups say

Gun Rights

As part of his proposed gun reforms, Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine wants to allow for the involuntary commitment of people with severe drug and alcohol problems. But advocates for those groups say state leaders need to come up with a plan beyond the initial 72 hours of the commitment. [Randy Ludlow/Dispatch] Hide caption To cut down on gun violence, the Ohio governor wants to allow for 72-hour commitments of people with serious drug and alcohol problems. The plan is prompting worries about effectiveness and capacity. Gov. Mike DeWine’s proposed gun legislation was light on new regulations over how people can keep or sell guns. But it greatly expanded the number of people who can be deprived of their freedom by allowing for the commitment of people with serious drug or alcohol problems for up to 72 hours without a hearing. A spokesman for Ohio’s hospitals said their emergency departments should have the capacity for such commitments. But the group that represents Ohio’s 88 county drug-and-mental-health agencies says those resources are already strained. And, the group’s leader said, state officials have to plan for care well beyond 72 hours if they want to make a meaningful impact on the lives of those who might be committed. DeWine detailed his proposed gun reforms Monday in response to an Aug. 4 mass shooting in Dayton that left nine dead in about half a minute. At a vigil afterward, the governor was speaking when he was showered with calls to “do something.” He […]

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