Ohio school district says it shouldn’t have to give workers gun training

COLUMBUS (AP) — A school district that voted after a deadly shooting to allow employees to be armed argued Tuesday in Ohio’s highest court that they shouldn’t have to first provide police-level training to those workers. The state Supreme Court heard oral arguments from both sides in the case involving Madison Local Schools in southwestern Ohio but didn’t indicate when it would rule. The district permitted the arming of its employees after a 2016 shooting in which two students were shot and wounded by a 14-year-old boy. A group of parents sued the district in September 2018 to prevent teachers from being armed without extensive training. A Butler County judge dismissed the lawsuit, saying that school staffers did not need extensive training because they are not law enforcement officers. The district’s policy requires 24 hours of training for staff carrying concealed weapons. The parents appealed to the 12th District Court of Appeals, which ruled last March that Ohio law requires anyone who carries firearms in schools to have undergone a minimum of 728 hours of law enforcement training. Parents maintain the state appeals court made the correct decision, saying state law is clear that schools can’t hire employees who are armed who don’t go through police officer training. The parents “are concerned about the tragic and fatal accidents that could befall their children when armed school staff have insufficient training and are carrying firearms all day, every day, in their children’s classrooms and on the playground,” attorneys for the […]

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