On gun control, a mother speaks for a dead son

On gun control, a mother speaks for a dead son

Gun Rights

Kristin and Michael Song. Their son, Ethan, died playing with a gun belonging to a friend’s father. On the day he died from a gunshot, 15-year-old Ethan Song had enjoyed a rite of passage for American teens: The removal of orthodontic braces, the big reveal of a new smile. His mother, Kristin, snapped a photo and sent it to her husband, Michael. It was the last taken of their youngest boy. Kristin and Michael Song testified Monday in support of state legislation requiring gun owners to safely store untended firearms, whether loaded or unloaded. Current law applies only to loaded weapons, even if ammunition is available. Michael toted a gun safe, a heavy box with a digital combination lock that he says could have saved Ethan’s life. It was one of seven firearms bills up for a public hearing, a mix of gun-control and gun-rights measures, and part of the unending conversation about how firearms can or should be regulated in a nation where the the U.S. Supreme Court has ruled that the Second Amendment means gun ownership is a constitutional right, though not an absolute one. The debate has special resonance in Connecticut, where more than a quarter-million residents have pistol carry permits, and firearms are sources of pride and horror. Hartford is where Samuel Colt produced the Peacemaker, the six-shooter that won the west. Sandy Hook is where 26 children and educators died in a school shooting committed with an AR-15, the most popular rifle in the […]

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