Parkland shooting: the people and politics two years later

Parkland shooting: the people and politics two years later

March For Our Lives Gainesville pins up pieces of paper with information about people who died in various mass shootings, such as their name, age and what they were like as told by loved ones. The first time Brandon Abzug opened his criminology textbook at UF, he saw the name of the man who murdered his high school classmates. “I just, I couldn’t read,” he said. “It was awful.” Abzug, a 19-year-old political science and criminology sophomore, is one of 268 Marjory Stoneman Douglas graduates enrolled at UF. His classmate Carmen Schentrup received a UF acceptance letter five days before she died in Parkland, Florida. Her name is nowhere to be found in the textbook. Schentrup shouldn’t have died in vain, Abzug said. Now, he fights to honor her and all victims of gun violence through legislative action. It’s been two years since the school shooting that claimed 17 lives and sparked the youth movement, March for Our Lives. As the 2020 presidential election draws near, Abzug and other student activists are propelling gun reform to the forefront of the conversation through lobbying, vigils and voting. “We took a tragedy and we decided to do something about it”: the activists Five days after his classmates and teachers were killed, Abzug and his parents drove to Tallahassee. He spent eight hours that day recounting his story — one of shock, terror and disbelief — to state legislators one-on-one. They talked about gun reform, the viability of universal background checks and […]

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.