PD Editorial: Close the ‘ghost gun’ loophole

PD Editorial: Close the ‘ghost gun’ loophole

A federal agent poses with ghost guns at a Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives office in Glendale. (JAE C. HONG / Associated Press, 2017) Our colleague Austin Murphy is a deft writer, but by his own admission, he isn’t much of a handyman. Yet he managed a potentially lethal DIY project — a “ghost gun.” Despite the moniker, there’s nothing supernatural about ghost guns. They’re deadly firearms, just like the ones sold by licensed dealers. But instead of a finished product, they’re sold as parts that can be assembled at home with some basic tools. They’re marketed with slogans like “Buy, Build, Shoot,” “Glocktober” sales and, in the case of Murphy’s kit, this promise: “No paperwork. And without serialization, there is no way to track your purchase.” That is what sets these guns apart. Because they do not have serial numbers, law enforcement agencies are unable to trace them from the manufacturer to the retailer to the original buyer. These guns are not only untraceable, but buyers duck background checks intended to keep firearms away from convicted felons and other people who aren’t legally entitled to possess them. Thus, they are ghost guns. Is it any surprise that they’re increasingly popular with criminals? In California, the New York Times reported, ghost guns accounted for 25% to 50% percent of firearms recovered at crime scenes over the past 18 months. Their proliferation has reached “epidemic proportions” in San Francisco, Oakland, San Diego and Los Angeles, law enforcement officials […]

Click here to view original web page at PD Editorial: Close the ‘ghost gun’ loophole

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.