Pittsburgh Restricts Use Of Assault-Style Weapons, Setting Up Court Fight

Pittsburgh Restricts Use Of Assault-Style Weapons, Setting Up Court Fight

Gun Rights

Supporters applaud after the Pittsburgh City Council voted to pass gun-control legislation on April 2. Pittsburgh’s mayor signed legislation Tuesday restricting the use of assault-style weapons in the city. The city council introduced a set of bills a few weeks after a gunman entered the Tree of Life synagogue in Pittsburgh in October killing 11 members, and injuring seven. But despite the mayor’s signature, Pittsburgh’s fight has just begun. Supporters of the legislation faced immediate resistance from gun rights advocates who say the city doesn’t have the authority to issue such a ban. The National Rifle Association quickly filed a lawsuit on behalf of some Pittsburgh residents: Pittsburgh tried to regulate assault style rifles over 20 years ago. But the courts have rejected those laws. State judges ruled that gun laws can only be regulated in the state’s capital of Harrisburg. Mayor Bill Peduto has said it is time for the city to do something about the city’s gun laws. "If we didn’t challenge laws, women wouldn’t be able to vote," Peduto said after the signing. City officials originally sought an outright ban on assault style rifles and ammunition and accessories. But the resistance was almost immediate. In January outside of Pittsburgh’s city hall, hundreds of protesters chanted "We will not comply." Many were strapped with the weapons that would be banned by the law. The protesters say the gun laws aren’t legal. Gun rights activist Justin Dillon, who organized that rally, says laws like this are a political […]

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