Politicians fear tough questions on guns, infrastructure, U.S. role in world

Politicians fear tough questions on guns, infrastructure, U.S. role in world

President Joe Biden signs the bipartisan “Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act” into law on the South Lawn of the White House on November 15. Photo by Sarah Silbiger/UPI | Centuries ago, the first American settlers gave thanks for their survival. Today, too many politicians are offering thanks for not having to confront or answer otherwise frighteningly direct questions about America and its role in the world. When pluralistic societies fear addressing tough questions that challenge the basic foundations for those societies, some things are very wrong and rotten — not only in Denmark, as Shakespeare wrote. Things are rotten here. Last week, Kyle Rittenhouse was acquitted by a jury of his peers of killing two fellow citizens and badly injuring a third with his assault rifle in Kenosha, Wis. What was a then-17-year-old doing crossing state lines with an AR-15 he was legally barred from buying but not carrying is one such question that cowers politicians, lest they become embroiled in arguments about the Second Amendment and the right to bear and carry arms? Congress finally passed the $1.9 trillion infrastructure bill. For all the debate over that bill, two critical questions will not even be raised. First, who on the Hill read the bill before it was passed and knows what was in it before voting? The answer is no one. The CEO of a public company who acted in the same manner in signing any financial or corporate statement without knowing its contents would be breaking the […]

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