Pushback on proposed Colorado gun laws gains steam among counties, sheriffs

Pushback on proposed Colorado gun laws gains steam among counties, sheriffs

Douglas County Sheriff Tony Spurlock, middle, seen here in 2019 in the state Capitol, said he thinks county commissioners overreached with new resolution about a gun bill that hasn’t passed yet. Helen H. Richardson, Denver Post The pandemic somewhat quieted debates over guns, but Republican resistance to Democrats’ new firearm-regulation efforts has blossomed once more — even after a pair of high-profile mass shootings in Colorado this year that left 16 people dead. This week, Douglas County commissioners passed a resolution stating their opposition to SB 21-256 , a proposal in the state legislature that would let local governments create stronger gun laws than those set out in state law. The commissioners affirmed in the resolution their support of citizens’ “rights to due process, to bear arms and to defend themselves from evil.” Less than three weeks earlier, commissioners in Weld County condemned not only SB21-256, but two other gun bills working their way through the legislature that would strengthen the background-check process and create an Office of Gun Violence Prevention. Even when new laws do go on the books, sheriffs across Colorado take varying approaches to enforcing them — like Weld County’s 2019 decision to declare itself a “Second Amendment sanctuary” after state lawmakers passed a red-flag law that gave judges the ability to temporarily take guns away from someone who is deemed a threat. More recently, Teller County Sheriff Jason Mikesell posted May 4 on his office’s Facebook page that “some believe the right to keep and […]

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.