Quay County gun-rights ‘sanctuary’ status catches like fire in New Mexico

Quay County gun-rights ‘sanctuary’ status catches like fire in New Mexico

Gun Rights

TUCUMCARI — Back when this Eastern New Mexico town was founded as a tent city in 1901, it was unofficially known as “Ragtown.” Another nickname — “Six Shooter Siding” — later emerged, reportedly because of the large number of gunfights that took place there. Still, firearms and the right to bear them are important to people in the community. The nonbinding resolution — spurred by controversial gun control legislation making its way through the Legislature — says the commission “will not authorize or appropriate government funds, resources, employees, agencies, contractors, buildings, detention centers or offices for the purposes of enforcing law that unconstitutionally infringes on the right of the people to keep and bear arms.” The “Second Amendment sanctuary county” concept, fanned by some sheriffs and spreading to New Mexico county commissions like prairie fire, was borrowed from activists who for several years have convinced some local governments to declare themselves “sanctuary cities” for undocumented immigrants — meaning local law enforcement won’t help federal officers arrest those whose only crime is being in the country illegally. Quay County was joined, in just a matter of days, by other rural counties — including Curry, Lincoln, Union, Socorro, San Juan, Eddy, Valencia, Catron, Chaves, Grant, Hidalgo and Sandoval. All have passed identical or similar resolutions. The Taos County Commission on Tuesday postponed a decision on a resolution proposed by Sheriff Jerry Hogrefe. Torrance County has scheduled a special meeting Monday to discuss the matter, and even small municipalities, including Estancia and […]

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