Racial equality and the Second Amendment

Racial equality and the Second Amendment

Handguns as seen on display on the convention floor of the Shooting, Hunting, and Outdoor Trade Show inside the Sands Convention Center in Las Vegas on Tuesday, Jan. 21, 2020. (Daniel Clark/The Nevada Independent) Just a day after President Joe Biden announced he would take executive action on gun control, the Assembly Judiciary Committee moved forward firearm reforms of its own in the Legislature. Assembly Bill 286— which passed out of committee on a party line vote —would ban homemade firearms that lack serial numbers and expand the locations where concealed carry permit holders are legally prohibited from carrying guns. Debate over these measures—as well as those yet to come—will undoubtedly be an amalgamation of tried-and-tired soundbites from both sides. Conservatives will declare, with righteous indignation, that the only thing capable of “stopping a bad guy with a gun is a good guy with a gun.” Meanwhile, gun control advocates will promote statistics about “gun violence” as irrefutable evidence that something must be done to start taking dangerous firearms “off the streets.” And yet, there’s a crucial aspect of the gun control debate that remains conspicuously and tragically under-discussed by both sides: The racial, historical and civic relevance of Second Amendment rights. The last several years of racial and cultural tension have had a predictable effect on firearm ownership that is certain to complicate progressives’ political calculus regarding gun control: More Americans are buying more firearms than ever, and minorities are increasingly joining the ranks of first-time gun buyers […]

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