RICKTER SCALE: Taking aim at arguments against the gun ban

RICKTER SCALE: Taking aim at arguments against the gun ban

A restricted gun licence holder holds an AR-15 at his home in Langley, B.C. Friday, May 1, 2020. The federal government has outlawed a wide range of rifles with the aim of making Canada safer, saying the guns were designed for the battlefield, not hunting or sport shooting. The ban issued Friday covers some 1,500 models and variants of what the government considers assault-style firearms, meaning they cannot be legally used, sold or imported, starting immediately. The list includes the popular AR-15 rifle and the Ruger Mini-14 used to kill 14 women at Montreal’s Ecole Polytechnique in 1989. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward) Rick Stiebel | Columnist Why is it necessary to assign style points to weapons of mass destruction? Any weapon that can blast a burst of bullets with a single squeeze is, in essence, an assault rifle, or an assault-style rifle, as the federal government has decided to describe them. Whatever they’re called, they are engineered for the sole purpose of killing as many people as possible in the shortest amount of time, end of story. While some are wringing their trigger fingers over the definition described in the Liberals’ ban, we’re losing sight of one simple but central fact. Each and every one of these killing machines was designed for military use. They are the tools of those who wage war. There is really no logical explanation for them to be considered part of any responsible gun owner’s personal collection. We already live in a country where […]

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