Rust shooting sparks fresh debate over gun violence on screen

Rust shooting sparks fresh debate over gun violence on screen

As police investigations continue into the death of cinematographer Halyna Hutchins as a result of a shooting during production of the Alec Baldwin film Rust, calls to ban real firearms on film and TV sets have intensified, with legislators in California and New Mexico threatening to take action if the entertainment industry does not. The continuing presence of guns on sets has also reopened the wider debate over the prevalence of gun violence on our screens, and its potentially harmful effects. For Steven Gaydos, executive VP of content for Variety, the nature of screen violence is dictated less by American gun culture than the realities of the international film market. “Gunplay in movies is arguably bigger now than it’s ever been,” he says. “If you try finance a movie you will quickly discover that if you aren’t killing somebody – via horror, or guns, or superheroes – you are in an area where nobody wants to go.” “It’s little to do with Hollywood’s own preferences,” he adds. “It has to do with what the computers tell the financiers how they can recoup their money – and that’s movies where people kill each other.” Daniel Craig in No Time to Die. Photograph: Allstar/MGM/Universal Pictures/Eon If major franchises are anything to go by, then the James Bond films certainly seem to suggest a greater readiness for in violence in blockbuster cinema. Informal research shows that prior to the release of No Time to Die , Daniel Craig’s 007 – who debuted […]

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