Second Amendment Sanctuary Movement Takes Hold in Vermont

Second Amendment Sanctuary Movement Takes Hold in Vermont

Gun Rights

Derek Brouwer From left: Brian Montminy II, Doug Swanson and Toni Eubanks at the Barton selectboard meeting On January 21, Brian Montminy II walked into the town offices in Barton, a place where firearms are ubiquitous enough that the Lake House Saloon across the street posts its "no guns" rule out front. He took a seat in the cramped room where local officials gather twice a month. "I have never been to a selectboard meeting in my life," Montminy told the two members in attendance. Wearing a flannel shirt and work pants, the 30-year-old town resident removed his ball cap and began to read the resolution he came to ask the officials to adopt. The measure would declare Barton a "Constitutional Gun Owner Township," recognizing the "inalienable" right to keep and bear arms. The statement declares "all federal and state laws and regulations attempting to restrict these rights to be infringements, hence null and void under this resolution." The last bit was the only hang-up for selectboard chair Toni Eubanks. She worried aloud about possible ramifications of defying state law. Fellow selectboard member Doug Swanson wasn’t concerned. "I’m ready to make a motion to sign it," he said. Such resolutions have sprung up in a dozen or so Vermont towns this month as some local gun-rights advocates latch on to the "Second Amendment sanctuary" movement that has galvanized activists in Virginia and several other states. Pittsford, Searsburg, Derby, Clarendon and Holland recently became the first Vermont towns to adopt […]

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