Second Amendment vs. safety from criminals at heart of 3D-printable gun debate

Second Amendment vs. safety from criminals at heart of 3D-printable gun debate

Gun Rights

The White House says President Donald Trump is “committed to the safety and security of all Americans” when asked about the blueprints for making firearms using 3D printers, the Associated Press reports. Defense Distributed, based in Austin, Texas, had reached a settlement with the federal government in June allowing the company to make the plans downloadable starting at 12 a.m. Wednesday. But, that is now on hold after a federal judge in Seattle issued a temporary restraining order Tuesday afternoon to stop the release of the blueprints . Local 6 reached out to several local law enforcement agencies for comment. Marshall County Sheriff Kevin Byars said, although the Kentucky Sheriff’s Association supports the Second Amendment, there are potential issues in regard to 3D-printable guns. Byars said he’d like to review the topic more before commenting further. A 3D printer creates real-world objects by stacking layer upon layer of plastic, following a digital blueprint that is created on a computer. Depending on the model of the printer, making even a small object can take hours. Although 3D printers are sold in stores and online, the ones needed to make firearms can cost thousands of dollars. Critics say guns created using 3D printers will get in the hands of dangerous people who can’t pass background checks. But supporters say it’s about the right to bare arms. Cody Wilson, founder of Defense distributed, tweeted on Monday, “I am now being sued by at least 21 state attorneys general. If you want your […]

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