SF’s ’93 rampage at 101 California continues to shape gun politics, policies

SF’s ’93 rampage at 101 California continues to shape gun politics, policies

Lying with her face pressed against an office floor, Michelle Scully squinted and saw the gunman’s shoe. Then, a flash of metal, the stench of barrel oil, and the steady sputter of a semiautomatic pistol. She closed her eyes. Twenty-five years later, Scully — now Michelle Scully Hobus — remembers the massacre at 101 California St. in crisp fragments. How her husband, John Scully, pulled her to the floor and shielded her with his rangy, 6-foot-4 body. How she dialed 911 with her left hand because her right arm and hand were limp from a bullet wound. How Scully gazed at her as blood ran from his nose and chest. “Michelle,” he said, “I’m dying. I love you.” He was one of eight people slain when a heavily-armed man stormed into a downtown San Francisco law firm in 1993 and opened fire. The killings, which stand as the worst mass homicide in modern San Francisco history, stunned the city and reshaped the politics of guns. Michelle Hobus, formerly Michelle Scully, holds a wedding picture of herself and her late husband, John Scully, at her home in Hawaiiin 2003, the 10th anniversary of her husband’s death in a mass shooting in a San Francisco high-rise. (Ronen Zilberman / Associated Press 2003 | San Francisco Chronicle) The effects of the 101 California shooting reverberate today, yet its legacy is complicated. The gun control activism that rose from that Financial District office building has claimed many legislative victories at the state level, […]

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