Shared values are, apparently, no match for strawman arguments

Shared values are, apparently, no match for strawman arguments

Hundreds of students, with parents and teachers, braved temperatures in the 20’s Wednesday morning to show their support for school choice, part of National School Choice Week, at the capital. Kindergartner Reagan Langtimm, Imagination Station School. January 25, 2017. Photo by Tim Dunn/Special to the Nevada Independent. Ascribing to our ideological rivals malicious intent before we even fully understand their position has, regrettably, become a staple in modern political discourse. According to the partisans, everyone is either a Nazi or a Marxist — a racist oppressor or a Stalinist wannabe. And, unsurprisingly, such perceptions of one another have led to absurd levels of political intolerance and disdain—not to mention a palpable decline in constructive political discourse. The consequence—aside from entertaining, albeit maddening, Twitter debates —is that our most profound areas of shared values are often overlooked. When The New York Times ’s Nikole Hannah-Jones—most widely known for her work on the 1619 Project —took a shot at the concept of educational choice, for example, it was clear she didn’t expect to have anything in common with her ideological “others.” “You already have choice,” Hannah-Jones said on Wednesday to school choice activists. “Homeschool or pay tuition.” Her critique undoubtedly smacked of “let them eat cake” elitism to the countless disadvantaged low-income families who are desperate for alternatives to their neighborhood public school. Paying private school tuition or foregoing work to homeschool one’s own child is, after all, largely a luxury afforded only to those with a certain level of financial […]

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