Sides clash over need for court-ordered gun removals in Texas

Sides clash over need for court-ordered gun removals in Texas

1 The Senate Select Committee on Violence in Schools and School Safety met at the Capitol on Tuesday. The committee is tasked with examining whether “red flag” laws that would allow state judges to remove guns from those shown to be a danger to themselves or others. RALPH BARRERA / AMERICAN-STATESMAN A special Texas Senate committee examining school gun violence heard sharply conflicting opinions on the need for “red flag” protective orders that would allow state judges to remove guns from those shown to be a danger to themselves or others. Gun rights advocates said Tuesday that a red flag law would unnecessarily duplicate existing Texas laws, would do nothing to stop mass school shootings and would improperly limit the constitutional right to bear arms. Advocates of the court orders, also known as extreme-risk protection orders, say they have helped other states prevent gun violence, particularly suicides, in ways that include enough checks and balances to improve safety while protecting individual rights. Gov. Greg Abbott asked lawmakers to look into the need for red flag protective orders as part of a 40-point plan unveiled after a student shooter killed 10 people at Santa Fe High School in May. However, it appears Tuesday’s debate at the Capitol was largely an academic exercise by the Senate Select Committee on Violence in Schools and School Security. After the public hearing, Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick, who presides over the Senate, released a statement that effectively classified a red flag law as dead on […]

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